RAISING HEALTHY CHILDREN

Your Growing Child

By YourCareEverywhere Staff @YourCareE
 | 
June 22, 2016

Growth expectations by age group.

Your child’s growth involves not only the length and weight of his body but also internal growth and development. Normal growth is categorized in a range that pediatricians use to gauge how a child is growing. Below are specific growth expectations by age with links to more information.

Newborn

n the first month of life, babies usually catch up to and surpass their birthweight, then steadily continue to gain weight. A weight loss up to about 10 percent of birthweight is normal in the first two to three days after birth. However, the baby should have gained this back and be at her birthweight by about two weeks. While all babies may grow at a different rate, there are growth chart averages for boys and girls up to 1 month of age.

1 to 3 months

While all babies may grow at a different rate, the following indicates the average for boys and girls 1 to 3 months of age:

  • Weight: average gain of about 1½ to 2 pounds each month
  • Height: average growth of over 1 inch each month
  • Head size: average growth of about ½ inch each month

4 to 6 months

  • Weight: average gain of 1 to 1¼ pounds each month; by 4 to 5 months has doubled birthweight
  • Height: average growth of ½ to 1 inch each month
  • Head size: average growth of about ½ inch each month

7 to 9 months

  • Weight: average gain of 1 pound each month; boys usually weigh about ½ pound more than girls; two times the birthweight by 4 to 5 months and three times the birthweight by 1 year
  • Height: average growth of about ½ inch each month
  • Head size: average growth of about ¼ inch each month

10 to 12 months

  • Weight: average gain of about 13 ounces each month; birthweight is doubled at approximately 4 to 5 months and tripled at one year
  • Height: average growth of just over 1/2 inch each month with most infants growing 10 inches in the first year.
  • Head size: average growth of about 1/2 inch each month

1-year-olds

After a baby's first birthday, the rate of growth begins to slow down. Your baby is now a toddler and is very active. 

2-year-olds

After a child's second birthday, the rate of growth continues to slow. Two-year-olds are very active and begin to lose the appearance of a baby. While all children may grow at a different rate, the following indicates the average for 2-year-old boys and girls:

  • Weight: average gain of about 4 to 6 pounds per year
  • Height: average growth of about 2 to 3 inches each year

3-year-olds

In 3-year-olds, growth is still slow compared to the first year. Most children have become slimmer and lost the rounded tummy of a toddler. While all children may grow at a different rate, the following indicate the average for 3-year-old boys and girls:

  • Weight: average gain of about 4 to 6 pounds per year
  • Height: average growth of about 2 to 3 inches per year

After age 2, children of the same age can noticeably vary in height and weight. As long as your child is maintaining his own rate of growth, there should be no reason to worry. You should consult your child's pediatrician if you do have concerns.

Preschool (4- to 5-years-old)

As your child continues to grow, you will notice new and exciting abilities that your child develops. While children may progress at different rates, the following are some of the common milestones children may reach in this age group:

4-year-olds:

  • Sings a song
  • Skips and hops on one foot
  • Catches and throws a ball overhand
  • Walks downstairs alone
  • Draws a person with three separate body parts
  • Builds a block tower with 10 blocks
  • Understands the difference between fantasy and reality

5-year-olds:

  • Jumps rope
  • Walks backward
  • Balances on one foot with eyes closed
  • Uses scissors
  • Begins learning to tie shoes
  • Copies shapes while drawing
  • Dresses self
  • Knows address and phone number
  • Recognizes and recites the alphabet
  • Permanent teeth may begin coming in

School-age (6- to 12-years-old)

As your child continues to grow, you will notice new and exciting abilities that your child develops. While children may progress at different rates and have diverse interests, the following are some of the common milestones children may reach in this age group:

6- to 7-year-olds:

  • Enjoys many activities and stays busy
  • Likes to paint and draw
  • May lose first tooth
  • Vision is as sharp as an adult's vision
  • Practices skills in order to become better
  • Jumps rope
  • Rides a bike

8- to 9-year-olds:

  • More graceful with movements and abilities
  • Jumps, skips, and chases
  • Dresses and grooms self completely
  • Can use tools (hammer, screwdriver)

10- to 12-year-olds:

  • Remainder of adult teeth will develop
  • Likes to sew and paint

Updated:  

April 07, 2020