DIGESTIVE CARE

10 Home Remedies for Acid Reflux

By Michele C. Hollow @michelechollow
 | 
November 13, 2017

Before you reach for prescription drugs, try these home remedies for acid reflux. You can find most in your kitchen and they are easy to do.

Acid reflux can be painful. The sharp, burning, or tightening sensations in your chest, neck, or throat are symptoms of acid reflux. Natural treatments are inexpensive and you probably have several home remedies for acid reflux in your kitchen.

 

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Acid reflux occurs when acid in your stomach moves up into your esophagus. It’s often described as heartburn. It’s not uncommon for people to confuse acid reflux with heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). They are not the same things. Acid reflux, which ranges in intensity from moderate to severe, is a common medical condition. Heartburn is a symptom of acid reflux and GERD. GERD is a chronic and much more severe form of acid reflux. If you think you have acid reflux, you can try these home remedies for acid reflux:

1. Eat raw almonds. You might have raw almonds in your kitchen. If not, they are available at grocery stores. The reason raw almonds are a good home remedy for acid reflux is because they contain calcium, which balances the acid in your body.

2. Drink aloe vera juice. Aloe vera juice has anti-inflammatory properties. It’s suggested that you drink two ounces of aloe vera juice daily. You can find natural aloe vera juice in health food stores and in some groceries.

3. Mix a cup of warm water with fresh lemon juice or combine a few drops of apple cider vinegar to warm water and drink. Rebekah Fedrowitz, an applied holistic nutritionist, suggests drinking freshly squeezed lemon juice or apple cider vinegar with warm water 15 minutes in the morning before eating breakfast. She says it’s a great digestive aid and is safe to drink. Although using either fresh lemon juice or apple cider vinegar is counter intuitive because they are acidic, she said both balance the pH levels of your lower esophageal sphincter (LES), which is located at the low end of the esophagus where it meets the stomach.

 

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Updated:

November 13, 2017

Reviewed By:

Janet O’Dell, RN